Posts Tagged ‘Emirati graduates’

Response to ‘Attract qualified locals to the private sector’

Posted on: May 7th, 2012 by Tom Pattillo No Comments

One of the training managers at the EmiratesNBD said in his reference for me: (Tom) “ you are a very fine trainer, plus your dedication and attitude towards Emiratization in UAE is unsurpassed amongst the expatriate population here.”

I have collected literally hundreds of articles and editorials on Emiratization gathered since I arrived in the UAE in August 2006. (I returned to Canada a year ago.) The comments in this article echo the same concerns I first read about six years ago.

In that time innumerable studies, pronouncements, publicity campaigns, and projects have come and gone. I had to dig deep for evidence of the failures.

Those who were tasked by the country’s leaders were well versed in the sycophantic skills required to slither out of accountability. (Indeed, often the very people who initiated the failed project were hired to create another project, and so on.)

My anger stems from my observation that a program that raises a person’s expectation of success, and then has them fail through no fault of their own, is extremely de-motivating. I have then listened to ex-pat professionals who imply publically and claim privately that the program failed because Emiratis are lazy, uneducated, unmotivated or whatever.

Yet even a simple analysis of the proposals of the past six years confirms that the same ideas, suggestions, projects, “pronouncements” are brought back to the public every year. I could criticize those experts, consultants, and leaders who have promulgated these worn-out ideas, but for what purpose.

Rather let me reiterate: Emirati employees ARE NOT lazy!

I have had more than enough of those comments. These comments originate from education administrators and consultants, as well as senior private industry managers, who would rather blame Emiratis rather than acknowledge their personal incompetence. Professional managers, educators, and employment consultants MUST begin to recognize the reality of the present UAE culture. The UAE is not comparable to any country in the world. Period. To apply outmoded and ineffective teaching and management methods and then blame the students and employees for the failure that results is both immoral and unethical.

Motivating the present generation (or allowing them to choose their own motivation) is an international issue. All over the world, the reality is being faced that financial rewards are not motivating. (Money (except for the greed of obsessed senior executives) is NOT the motivator it “perhaps” was.

To understand why please read Drive by Daniel Pink. (And apply the concepts.)

I have had the honor to work with Emirati women as an instructor at the HCT, as a freelance trainer with the Sharjah Museums Department, and the Emirates National Bank of Dubai. (And many other organizations both public and private.)

These women are tremendously motivated. They are very intelligent. They are aware of the world around them – inside and outside the UAE. They know that to work, start a family, be a good spouse and an active and influential citizen is AT PRESENT best facilitated by working in Public Service. It is hard to refute their conclusions.

For five years I worked on a project to demonstrate the viability and benefits a private industry career can bring. I focused on developing a business owned and operated by Emirati women. I have prepared (and would love to conduct) a program to bring Emirati women graduates into the world of private business.

My background as owner of a “Business” Soft Skills Training company in Canada led me to develop a project that would train Emirati women graduates to create and operate a small company similar to mine. (Catalyst Consulting, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada 1985 to 1999.)

Remuneration, benefits, services and holidays would be at least equal to those offered by the government. The goal, other than the explicit goal of building a successful business, is to demonstrate a method of bringing Emirati graduates into private industry.

My role as mentor, trainer of the trainers, marketing and sales expert, and entrepreneur (my experience owning and operating Catalyst Consulting in Canada for 14 years) gives me the practical and academic background to bring to the project. Of equal importance is hiring and working with an experienced Emirati business woman to be a liaison with all Emirati stakeholders; family, investors, customers, service providers and participants.

Young women to whom I have explained this project have reacted very positively. They are concerned about how they would be paid until the Training Centre is self-sustaining. Other successful businesswomen have expressed both confidence in the program and the possibility of offering to be the experienced businesswoman I need to work on the project with me.




Response to: “Hatching a Job Plan.” UAE National News SE2411

Posted on: September 24th, 2011 by Tom Pattillo No Comments

I respect Mr. Weir’s desire to offer ideas on “Hatching a Job Plan.”
I have some difficulty with the ideas.

First, “What does job creation look like in the Arab world?” is a good question.

Second: The three suggestions (addressed individually below) do not address the UAE reality, let alone the Arab world reality.

A few assumptions:

a) The primary (or implied) target market for these initiatives are Emirati Nationals. The goal is to increase the Emirati presence and percentage in the private business sector. (Thereby decreasing the dependence on ex-pats in the private business sector throughout the UAE.)

b) There is a “culture” in the UAE that embraces the “visceral feel of entrepreneurial greatness.” (Theodore Levitt “Marketing Myopia”)

c) If money were available, the only thing missing is training related to today’s job market.

Fuel entrepreneurial activity:

The very nature of the word “entrepreneur” (the person who creates new businesses), pre-supposes a national business environment and culture that accepts and supports private enterprise, accountability, and a level playing field. If this is not the case, all efforts are merely handouts.

The UAE is a “rentier” state regardless of protestations to, and denial of, this fact. (Please remember: “Just because you ignore the facts doesn’t mean they go away.”)

Please read: http://www.semp.us/publications/biot_reader.php?BiotID=227 (or look up the definition of a rentier state)

A “rentier” state’s revenue does not come from the citizen effort, it comes from “external rent (that) liberates the state from the need to extract income from the domestic economy.”

“The government becomes an allocation state, which is very different from a production state.

A production state relies on taxation of the domestic economy for its income; taxpayers stay involved with government decisions because they are supporting them with onerous taxes.

An allocation state, by contrast, does not depend on domestic sources of revenue but rather IS the primary source of revenue itself in the domestic economy.

The primary goal of the allocation state’s economy is spending.”

“the rentier . . . violates the most sacred doctrine of the liberal ethos: hard work.”

“The economic behavior of a rentier is distinguished from conventional economic behavior ‘in that it embodies a break in the work-reward causation.’”
“Rewards of income and wealth for the rentier do not come as the result of work but rather are the result of chance or situation.”
The rentier mentality is a “psychological condition with profound consequences for productivity:

contracts are given as an expression of gratitude rather than as a reflection of economic rationale;

civil servants see their principal duty as being available in their offices during working hours;

businessmen abandon industry and enter into real-estate speculation or other special situations associated with a booming oil sector;

the best and brightest abandon business and seek out lucrative government employment;

manual labor and other work considered demeaning by the rentier is farmed out to foreign workers, whose remittances flood out of the rentier economy; and so on.

In extreme cases income is derived simply from citizenship.”

(Please refer to the website (address above) for reference information.

The efforts of all Emirati leaders are to be lauded. They are setting goals for Emiratization. They are providing education opportunities (often free) for their citizens. They are encouraging more participation by citizens in the private business sector.

However, you cannot create a “reality” that is at odds with the prevailing culture. Culture wins every time. Receiving money without attaching effort, accountability, pride, and “the respect of friends and family” will never push people to look for jobs in the private sector, let alone to take the risks associated with becoming an entrepreneur.

Entrepreneurs are a special group. They risk. They take risks. (Not unexamined and naive risks, (that just promotes failure), but they do step away from security, certainty, a guaranteed salary and lifestyle.

The suggestions to facilitate small-business loans and train workers for today’s job market, are irrelevant other that to provide opportunities to avoid reality.

My weakness is my desire to help Emirati college and university graduates enter the workforce, consider the private sector as a realistic and attractive alternative to the public sector, and help them become proud, effective, and creative citizens of the UAE and the world. And I have done and will do everything I can to help that happen.

I say weakness because I refuse to play the “colonial” game. I will not be a sycophant. I will say and repeat the obvious rather than stay silent and take the rewards; job, high salary, no accountability, and false credibility based on past education and experience. (I much prefer nepotism to cronyism. With nepotism you know what you are getting. With cronyism what you are getting is just a guess (without any reliable vetting). And only the new employee and his “crony” benefit.)

Please know, however, that I continue to be a huge fan and supporter of the Emirati college and university graduates (mostly women) with whom I have worked. I believe, however, that an employment strategy that ignores the cultural reality of a nation is both unethical and immoral.

A problem is either managed or solved. Pseudo managers, experts, and consultants benefit from “managing” a problem. To solve the problem means they stop getting paid to solve the problem. As long as these people can make it “seem” like they are doing something productive, they will NEVER solve the problem. (They will however, vigorously and vehemently attack anyone who questions their recommendations.)

Do I have the answers? No.

Do I believe there are processes both to address the issues and to develop (with continuous and in depth participation by all Emirati citizens)? Yes.

Do I think that ideas can be generated that include the rentier reality and it cultural impact, while generating a culture of, and a desire to be part of, the private sector. Yes.

If you agree with my response to Mr. Weir’s article, do something, speak to those in power, challenge them to accept rather than deny, and call on their national pride, their love of their children, and the potential of the United Arab Emirates, to be the stimulus that moves them to action.

Other resource: http://supportinglocalentrepreneurship.wordpress.com/